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rest of us who are aging. i think we should be in charge, don't you, brian? on that note, thank you so much, everybody. we've got a rally going on out there. it looks as if the street is expecting some kind of deal, but as bob pisani's been saying, i'm wonder if it's a bite rumor and sell the fact situation. >> more negative now than when i came down here. >> that's not very encouraging. where's the hope "closing bell" is next. >> a government fractured, a market paralyze. a call to action our markets careen towards the sharp edge of the fiscal cliff. we've is asked our politicians to seem compromise and find a solution. the clock is ticking down. the stakes are getting higher. now we're turning up the pressure. this is a cnbc special report, "mission critical, rise above d.c." >> and we do welcome you to "closing bell." i'm bill griffith here at the new york stock exchange. hey, maria. >> hey there, bill. big rally where you are. i'm bartiromo coming today from the white house for our special coverage. stocks rallying on the on the missile that perhaps we are nearing a fiscal cliff
reached. >> i'm sure you'll continue to monitor it for us. we'll get back to you when there's something new to know. in the meantime, what are you supposed to do as an investor? we saw how the dow really swung during the president's speech. we saw the spike up and came back down and now we're seeing it through the day. why don't we bring in our cast of thousands here. ben willis, jason milly, brad fredelander, and of course rick santel santelli. ben let me get to you first of all. what do you feel this means beyond just the market moves today, the emerging deal what does it mean for the markets once we crack into the new year? >> we knew they could do it, it just took a long embarrassing cost of our reputation in the world to get it done. with that being said, i think you mentioned the capping on the tax deductions. you want to keep an eye on the high end housing and the high end buildings. if that does come to fruition. but the whole tape is moving. apple in and of itself is moving the nasdaq today. that may be a function of the idea of the continuation of the tax benefits for writeoff
. in fact, it's sitting on the lows of the session at 13,135. danny hughes is with us from divine capital and mark spellman from value line funds and joe greco on the flor with meridian equity partners and our rick santelli is standing by in chicago. rearranged priorities on this, and the market really reflects that. >> absolutely does, bill. a hard day to trade when you're so focused on the tragedy that's unfolding in front of us, and as the mother of a kindergartner and a pre-school child my heart goes out to these families. it's a real terrible thing. >> we do have business to conduct though in washington. >> we do. >> and when we last left that story it appeared there was very little progress made. how do you invest in that kind of an environment? >> even less is happening frankly, so, you know what, we have to do is still keep our eye on the ball and have to believe that at some point something will further itself, whether it happens whether we go over the cliff or before that. reinvest in companies that are dividend payers, that have an efficiency paradigm so whether they are invest
you very much for taking the time. >> thank you. >> thank you very much for joining us today, michael johnson, the ceo of herbalife. the markets are currently sitting around the lows of the day as we speak. the dow down by about 56 points, and that is it for "street signs" today. "closing bell" is coming up next. >> hi, everybody. good afternoon. we enter the final stretch and welcome to the "closing bell." i'm maria bartiromo at the new york stock exchange. scott, good to see you. here with scott wapner. the market near the lows on the day on fears that a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff may actually be a lot further away than we thought. >> more sparring today. deal, i don't know. if you listen to what they are saying today, scott wapner in for bill griffith. the president calling for compromise in a news conference today, but here on wall street there is a bit less optimism for the deal than we've felt in recent days. see where we sit right now. the dow is down 56 points. nasdaq and s&p under some pressure as well right now as we -- there you go. nasdaq is down six and the s&p, maria
. joining us now are david faber, bob pisani and steven guilfoyle and rick santelli at the cme. first, david, who broke the story this morning, i guess this deal had to happen based on where the competitive landscape sits, and it's likely not going to be the last deal that we've been talking about. >> we've been thinking about and hearing about and talking about deals for quite some time but much of that did not happen as a result of regulators. the nyc has been looking for quite some time to figure out the future. its ceo having engaged with and having a deal with deutsche boerse sometime back, two years ago, in heated discussions and announced it in 2011. a year later it was dead? why, because of the derivatives business in europe that european regulators did not want to see get together for both of those companies. couldn't get around t.nasdaq as well, along with i.c.e. at the time, had made a hostile bid, you may recall, from the new york stock exchange, but that was stopped as well because it wasn't going to happen as a result of antitrust here in the u.s., a americaning of the two equi
now. okay. everybody's there. mandy? >> okay. joining us now we have a cast of thousands. dan mcmahon from raymond james. nathan backrat. and our very own rick santelli. thank you for joining us today. nathan, let's start with you. so 13 and a half trading days left. what do you do with those to make it worth it? >> y better have the right allocation to begin with. in the meantime guess what's gotten cheaper? europe. >> germany and france at two-week highs last week. >> there's a few countries over there. i like the relative value there. they've got a printing press. they're going to open that. what i learned is you don't fight the tape and don't fight a bailout. i've got about 30% off this country -- outside of this country. and added 10% in emerging markets. now i think that we've had a bloodless revolution again in china, i think it's a great place. look at emerging markets. better value while you wait around. >> and they've done well over the last year. it was just they've been the silent gain. you haven't quite realized they've been doing so well. >> i like it. i wouldn't ru
details for us. eamon. >> reporter: hi, bill. that letter does call for the speaker to negotiate, including all options on the table. it is a bipartisan letter. we should be a little bit careful on this because the letter habit actually been sent yet, we're told by congressman mike simpson's office. he's the congressman circulating the letter. he's gathering signatures from other members of congress, as we speak. they expect to send this letter. i've talked to some conservative republicans today here on capitol hill who say their minds are not changed, and that's going to be the group that's most difficult for the speaker to negotiate. nonetheless, the fact there's such a letter being circulated probably gives speaker boehner more elbow room in his negotiations and might help him beat back a little brush fire he saw on the right wing yesterday for being criticized after offering up $800 billion in tax increases. meanwhile, the white house confirming it has directed the office of management and budget to prepare plans for these massive spending cuts that would come at the end of t
bell exchange. carol roth, the author of "entrepreneurial equation" is with us. from chicago, keith springer from springer financial adviser and john carpina is on the floor with us, and rick santelli, of course, is in chicago as well. carol, you've been skeptical about this market, but you, if i read you correctly, any rally that's going on right now, you might want to fade. you're not too convinced at the long-term outlook right now, am i right? >> i think what we're going to get. we're going to get a deal, but the deal isn't going to solve our problems, and so in the short term everyone is going to be very, very excited about this. we have a deal. uncertainty is off the table. we're printing money. i think that's going to be very good in the short term. my problem in the longer term is the long-term drag from all of these companies not investing today. they are doing share buybacks, they are doing special divide s dividends. >> right. >> they are not investing in their companies, so in the short term it will be fantastic. i just don't know what's going to happen in the long term
the confidence to pursue all her goals. when you want a financial advisor who sees the whole picture, turn to us. wells fargo advisors. >>> hi, everybody. happy monday to you. welcome to the "closing bell." i'm maria bartiromo. >> i'm bill griffith. who'd have thunk it? stocks gaining today on a proposal about a tax increase. markets in the green kicking off the week with hopes speaker john boehner is floating higher tax on people with incomes over $1 million. we're wondering if this will be a beginning of a kick start for a deal finally. >> certainly feels like the market feels that way. compares to the $250,000 threshold which originally the president had been sticking to. take a look. even though it is off of the best levels which happened at about 1:00 p.m. eastern today. on the s&p still higher by 11 points. >> the markets watching washington and shuttling back and forth between the white house and the capitol. eamon javers has the latest. >> it looks like at this point the senate is going to have to come back on december 26th to take up among other pieces of legislation the fiscal cliff so
to allocate capital then in that environment. i know george young is with us again, joining the conversation. i want to ask you the same question. go ahead, scott. how are you investing right now? >> maria, i think the best way forward is the way it's worked since the bottom of the market in 2009. risk assets are where it's at. the fed is very supportive. the consumer is back and engaged. housing is getting better. the fiscal cliff is actually constructive from the standpoint it causes people to come together and compromise because going over the cliff while we may do it for a short time period is not beneficial to anybody. it hurts everybody. >> so risk assets being, what, technology? what does that mean, technology? >> not necessarily. we would stay with dividend payers. we would also dip our toe into europe into some very high-quality, multicountry stocks there. mostly on consumer discretionary stocks as well. >> george, we haven't forgotten you yet. scott, i have a question for you. just noticed today france and germany's stock markets hit 52-week highs. we're still wringing our hands ov
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10